Tech Notes

In what chemistry do you develop film?
For color negative and slide processing we use Kodak chemistry; for Black and White processing we use Xtol stock chemistry.

Why Xtol and not other chemistries, like D76 or Rodinol?
As a professional film processing lab we have to be able to process a wide range of black and white film brands and speeds, each of which has it’s own development time.  After extensive testing we determined Xtol gave us the best results over the widest range of films, from short development films such as Kodak to long development films such as Ilford.

What scanners do you use?
We have four machines on which we can produce scans:
Drum scan - Crosfield Celsis 6200
Imacon scan - Imacon Flextight X5
Machine/rollscans - Noritsu QSS-3411
Flatbed - Epson Expression 11000XL Photo Scanner

On what machine do you print the large chromogenic prints?
We use  a  Gretag Lightjet 430 to expose the chromogenic paper and an Hostert Pro RA4 machine to process the print.

On what machine do you print inkjet prints?
For our Pigment inkjet prints we use the Epson Stylus Pro 11880 which combines the new Epson innovative ink-jet technologies. The new Epson Micro Piezo TFP print head and Epson UltraChrome™ K3 inks with Vivid Magenta technology supply brilliant, long-lasting and standard results.

I’m interested in having an LVT of my image made.  What size file will I need for that?
The Icon currently only produces LVTs on 35mm film.  The  size of your file will need to be 0.923” x 1.362” at 1016 dpi.

What are the specs you require to submit files for printing?

To keep our prices as low as possible, images submitted for printing should be set up as follows:
    • Images must be 'to size', e.g.  if you want an 11x14 print you must give us file sized to 11x14;
    • Images ideally must have a resolution of 300 ppi (pixels per inch) and must be in RGB color mode  We can also accept  images in grayscale mode if we are printing on Pigment Inkjet.
    • Files must be TIFF  or JPEG, 8 bits per channel, flattened, with no alpha channels;
    • Any cropping or borders must be in the file.  Our Easy Print service Online does have an editor built  in where you can crop and add borders if needed.  If you require our staff to crop and/or resize your images for  you additional charges will apply.
    • There must be one of the following valid color profiles included in the file, unless printing in Grayscale on our Pigment Inkjet printer:
        -sRGB
        -Adobe 98
        -ColorMatch

Does the Icon have an ICC Profile I can download?
Due to the constantly changing variables that can affect the final output of a print, such as temperature, humidity and paper stock, we have not created ICC profiles for our papers, but rather rely on the standard RGB profiles in which most artists and professionals work such as Adobe98, sRGB, or ColorMatch.  

What's the difference between a TIFF and JPG?
TIFF is widely accepted as the photograph file standard in the printing industry.   TIFF stands for Tagged Image File Format is a flexible image format that normally saves 16-bits per color or 8-bit per color, and uses a filename extension of TIFF or TIF.  TIFF is generally 'lossless", meaning all image information is retained when saved in the TIFF format using LZW or Packbits compression to reduce file size.

JPG (or JPEG) stands for Joint Photographic Experts Group and is a compressed image format that sacrifices some image quality in order to achieve smaller file sizes.  The amount of image quality loss id directly related to the reduction in file size.  For instance, when saving, a Quality Level 12 file should look nearly identical to the uncompressed image, but has the least reduction in size.  A Quality Level of 2 will reduce the file size significantly, but the quality of the image will be noticeably degraded.  The advantage of a JPEG file is that due to its smaller size, it can be sent and received more easily (e.g. via email) and it requires less space for storage.  A high-quality JPEG can produce excellent prints.

My files are PDFs.  Can I submit that for printing?
We can only print from jpgs or tiffs.  If your file is a PDF, PSD file, PNG or DNG file, it would have to be converted to jpg or tiff in order for us to print your image.

What size should my files be for printing?
We most commonly state file sizes in Megabytes - MB.  A Resolution of 300 dpi is recommended for standard sized prints while large prints can be made from 200 dpi files in order to save money and disk space. This chart provides the file sizes in MB for prints at 300 dpi, 200 dpi and 150 dpi. You can use these sizes to determine appropriate scan sizes for printing. For file sizes in pixels, please see below.
 

Print Size

300 dpi    

200 dpi    

150 dpi

4 x 6

6 MB

3 MB

2 MB

5 x 7

9 MB

4 MB

3 MB

8 x 10

20 MB

10 MB

6 MB

11 x 14

40 MB

18 MB    

10 MB

16 x 20    

83 MB

37 MB

21 MB

20 x 24    

124 MB

55 MB

31 MB

20 x 30    

155 MB

69 MB

39 MB

24 x 30    

185 MB

82 MB

46 MB

30 x 30    

232 MB

103 MB  

58 MB

30 x 40

309 MB

137 MB

77 MB

40 x 40    

412 MB

183 MB

103 MB

40 x 48    

495 MB

220 MB

124 MB

48 x 48    

593 MB

264 MB

148 MB

48 x 60    

741 MB

330 MB

185 MB

48 x 72

890 MB

395 MB

222 MB

48 x 84    

1 GB

462 MB

260 MB

48 x 96    

1.2 GB

527 MB

297 MB

48 x 108

NR

593 MB

334 MB

48 x 120

NR

660 MB

371 MB

 

Pixel Dimensions
This chart provides the files size for prints using pixel dimensions.

 Print Size

300 dpi

200 dpi

150 dpi

4 x 6

1200 x 1800

800 x 1200

600 x 900

5 x 7

1500 x 2100

1000 x 1400

750 x 1050

8 x 10

2400 x 3000

1600 x 2000

1200 x 1500

11 x 14

3300 x 4200

2200 x 2800

1650 x 2100

16 x 20

4800 x 6000

3200 x 4000

2400 x 3000

20 x 24

6000 x 7200

3000 x 3600

3000 x 3600

20 x 30

6000 x 9000

4000 x 6000

3000 x 4500

24 x 30

7200 x 9000

4800 x 6000

3600 x 4500

30 x 40

9000 x 12000

6000 x 8000

4500 x 6000

 

I have a new camera that shoots X Megapixels - how large can I print with that?  And just what is a Megapixel, anyway?
A pixel is one dot of information in a digital image.  One million pixels are a megapixel, so 12 megapixels = 12 million pixels.The following chart shows common digital camera file sizes in megapixels, approximate pixel dimensions, file size in megabytes and safe print sizes.

Megapixels

Pixel Dimensions

File Size

Print at 150 dpi

Print at 300 dpi

6 megapixels

2000 x 3000

17 megs

11" x 14"

6.6" x 10"

8 megapixels

2500 x 3200

23 megs

16" x 20"

8.5" x 11"

10 megapixels

2800 x 3600

28 megs

20" x 24"

9" x 12"

12 megapixels

3000 x 4000

34 megs

22" x 28"

10" x 13"

16 megapixels

3600 x 4500

46 megs

24" x 30"

12" x 15"

20 megapixels

4000 x 5000

57 megs

26" x 33"

13" x 16.5"

22 megapixels

4000 x 5300

60 megs

26" x 35”

13" x 18"

28 megapixels

4600 x 6100

80 megs

30" x 40"

15" x 20"

33 megapixels

5000 x 6700

96 megs

35" x 48"

16.5" x 22"